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Frederic Remington Makes Tracks: Adventures and Artistic Impressions

March 28 - May 20, 2007

 

The Museum of Wisconsin Art brings two great masters of sculpture and painting together -- Frederic Remington (1861-1909) and Wisconsin artist Richard Lorenz (1858-1915) -- when Frederic Remington Makes Tracks: Adventures and Artistic Impressions, organized by The Frederic Remington Art Museum, Ogdensburg, New York, opens March 28 and continues through May 20, 2007. (right: Richard Lorenz (1858-1915), Horse Market Midwinter, oil on canvas)

Frederic Remington (1861-1909) was the most popular artist in America at the turn of the last century. He had produced over three thousand signed flat works, eight books, and twenty-two bronzes when he died at the age of forty-eight. America was introduced to him through his many illustrations for the popular magazines of the day; Harper's, The Century, Collier's and many more.

Richard Lorenz was a contemporary of Remington along with other Wisconsin artists featured at the Museum of Wisconsin Art including John Fery (1861-1909), Franz Biberstein (1850-1930) and, to a lesser extent, Henry Vianden (1814-1899). All were born in Europe and worked in Wisconsin yet were drawn westward by the same elements that inspired Remington: wide open spaces, a unique landscape, cowboys, cattle, buffalo, Native-Americans. These were all things that physically realized the lore and stereotypical images of the American west that they brought with them from Europe. These pictures are the result of these artists seeking the truth for themselves.

The Remington prints, which date nearly to the beginning of Remington's illustration career, all fit into the category of reproduction. Remington, in each case, produced an original work of art, which the various magazines and publishers would reproduce mechanically. Usually, the publishers would make them in large, unrecorded, numbers, according to market demand. By far, the most numerous prints were those published by Collier's -- both in the number of images made, and the large numbers of each that they printed. Remington had a contract with Collier's to produce a painting a month beginning in 1902. Each painting would be featured in color inside the magazine, and offered for sale through mail order. They were often reprinted in different sizes, and marketed in different groupings. Remington's diaries show that he burned numerous paintings. As he evolved from an illustrator to an acclaimed painter, he did not want to be remembered for his more illustrative work. Sometimes, the prints are the best record of a painting's existence. (right: Frederic Remington (1861-1909), The Great Explorers IV - Radisson, color halftone, 1905. Courtesy of The Frederic Remington Art Museum, Ogdensburg, New York )

The prints in this exhibition, and almost one hundred more like them, were the way most people, for the past century, enjoyed Frederic Remington's work. Frederic Remington's original paintings and drawings are plentiful (and expensive) but finite. Most people did not have access to Remington paintings, but the prints were very popular substitutes. They were commonplace in ordinary homes. When we look at these prints today, we see Remington's art as most people of his time experienced it.

The showing in West Bend, Wisconsin is part of a nine city national tour over a two and a half year period containing fifty prints, three fine silver recast sculptures and one bronze portrait of Remington. The tour was developed and managed by Smith Kramer Fine Art Services, an exhibition tour development company in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

About Smith Kramer Fine Art Services

Founded in 1981 by David Smith, Smith Kramer Fine Art Services has enjoyed twenty-five years of growth in serving the art community. In partnership with the institutions and collectors, Smith Kramer Fine Art Services budgets, markets, crates, insures, transports, and handles all services of the exhibition from concept to completion. -- edited text, courtesy Smith Kramer Fine Art Services. Also see The David Smith Story: Sharing the Arts (11/14/97).

 

Introductory text panel from the exhibition

"No American artist interests the people more than Remington does, and none is really better worth going to see."
- Newspaper quote taken directly from Remington's journal, December 11, 1909
 
Frederic Remington (1861-1909) was the most popular artist in America at the turn of the last century. He had produced over three thousand signed flat works, eight books, and twenty-two bronzes when he died at the age of forty-eight. America was introduced to him through his many illustrations for the popular magazines of the day: Harper's, The Century, Collier's and many more.
 
The prints, which date nearly to the beginning of Remington's illustration career, all fit into the category of reproduction. Remington, in each case, produced an original work of art, which the various magazines and publishers would reproduce mechanically. Usually, the publishers would make them in large, unrecorded, numbers, according to market demand. By far, the most numerous prints were those published by Collier's - both in the number of images made, and the large numbers of each that they printed. Remington had a contract with Collier's to produce a painting a month beginning in 1902. Each painting would be featured in color inside the magazine, and offered for sale through mail order. They were often reprinted in different sizes, and marketed in different groupings. Remington's diaries show that he burned numerous paintings. As he evolved from an illustrator to an acclaimed painter, he did not want to be remembered for his more illustrative work. Sometimes, the prints are the best record of a painting's existence.
 
The prints in this exhibition, and almost one hundred more like them, were the way most people, for the past century, enjoyed Frederic Remington's work. Frederic Remington's original paintings and drawings are plentiful (and expensive) but finite. Most people did not have access to Remington paintings, but the prints were very popular substitutes. They were commonplace in ordinary homes. When we look at these prints today, we see Remington's art as most people of his time experienced it.


Museum panel from the exhibition

The Frederic Remington Art Museum is in Ogdensburg, New York, on Remington's beloved St. Lawrence River. Between 1915 and 1918, Frederic Remington's widow, Eva, lived in the house that became the museum in 1923. When she died in 1918, she left her collection of Frederic Remington's paintings, drawings, bronze sculptures and vast archives to the people of the city of Ogdensburg. Based on the theme of so much of his work, many assume that Remington was a westerner. However, he spent most of his life in New York State. In fact, he was born and buried in Canton, New York, spent part of his boyhood in Ogdensburg, and visited the area every summer. Situated at the very top of New York, north of the Adirondack Mountains, this area was Remington's northern wilderness and summer playground. It is a fitting place for the museum.
 
The collection has grown since the founding gift, thanks to many generous donations of Remington art and archival materials. The facility has grown to meet increased needs, with gallery and collections space added in 1976 and in 1996. In 2004, the museum opened the Eva Caten Remington Education Center, adding hands-on children's exhibits and classroom space. The museum is open year-round.
 
The mission of the Frederic Remington Art Museum is to collect, exhibit, preserve and interpret the art and archives of Frederic Remington. The Museum fosters an appreciation for and an understanding of the artist by educating its audience in the visual arts and by providing a context for Remington's life in Northern New York.
 

Wall labels from the exhibition

A Navajo Sheep-Herder
1888
published 1888 in John Muir's Picturesque California by
The J. Dewing Company
black and white photogravure
 
Fight for the Waterhole
a.k.a. An Arizona Waterhole
a.k.a. A Water-hole in the Arizona Desert
1903
copyright 1908 and printed in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Charge
a.k.a. A Cavalry Scrap
1906
edition printed and published 1910 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Emigrants
1904
published 1910 in Collier's catalog
color halftone
 
The Navajo Raid
1907
published 1910 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Sioux Chief
a.k.a. A War Chief
part of A Bunch of Buckskins series of eight, a portfolio by R. H. Russell
1901
edition printed 1901
color lithograph
 
The Half-Breed
1902
one of four published 1902 by Charles Scribner's Sons and sold boxed as
Western Types
color halftone
 
The Scout
1902
third of four published by Charles Scribner's Sons 1902 and sold boxed
as Western Types
color halftone
 
Goose Shooting
a.k.a. Canada Goose Shooting
a.k.a. Pheasant Shooting
1889
from portfolio edited by A.C. Gould
titled Sport: or Shooting and Fishing
Bradless, Whidden Publishing Co. 1889
chromolithograph
 
The Great Explorers IV-Radisson
a.k.a. Pierre Radisson
a.k.a. Exploring the Lakes
a.k.a. Radisson and Groseillers
1905
published 1906 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Great Explorers IX-Zebulon Pike
a.k.a. Zebulon Pike Entering Santa Fe
a.k.a. A Spanish Escort
1905
printed 1906 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Great Explorers X-Jedediah Smith
1905
published 1906 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
Bringing Home the New Cook
1907
edition published 1907 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
Shotgun Hospitality
a.k.a. Shot Gun Hospitality
1908
published 1910 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Stampede by Lightning
a.k.a. The Stampede
1908
published 1911 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The End of the Day
1904
printed and offered as full-color "artist's proof" in Collier's catalog
in 1906
color halftone
 
Dash for the Timber
1889
published in 1890 by The Gravure Etching Company
black-and-white photoengraving
 
A "Sun Fisher"
a.k.a. A "Sunfisher"
1895
published 1895 by Davis & Sanford Co
black-and-white lithograph
 
Soldiers Opening Their Veins for Want of Water
a.k.a. After the Skirmish
1896
published 1898 by The Werner Co., Akron, Ohio,
black-and-white rotogravure
 
Missing
a.k.a. The Captive
1899
printed 1899 by R. H. Russell
black-and-white platinum print
 
A Monte Game at Southern Ute Agency
a.k.a. Mexican Monte
a.k.a. Card Game at Ignacio
1900
published in 1906 as black-and-white "artist's proof" on pebbled art
paper by Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
Indians Simulating Buffalo
a.k.a. Indians Disguised as Buffalo
1908
published 1909 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Scouts
1908
published 1908 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
With the Eye of the Mind
1908
published 1909 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
An Arizona Cowboy
part of A Bunch of Buckskins series of eight, a portfolio by R. H. Russell
1901
edition printed 1901
color lithograph
 
Coming to the Call
1905
edition printed and offered as full-color "artist's proofs" in Collier's
catalogs in 1906/1907
color halftone
 
Evening on a Canadian Lake
1905
published 1905 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Howl of the Weather
a.k.a. The Squall
1905/1906
published 1907 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
Drifting Before the Storm
1904
published 1904 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Bell Mare
a.k.a. In the Enemy's Country
a.k.a. Pack Train in Moonlight
1903
edition printed as part of portfolio of Six Remington Paintings in Color
in 1906
color halftone
 
A Halt in the Wilderness
a.k.a. Halt of a Cavalry Patrol to Warm
1905
offered 1906 in Collier's catalog as a two-color "artist's proof"
color halftone
Benighted for a Dry Camp
a.k.a. Benighted- and a Dry Camp
a.k.a. The Dry Camp
1907
addition printed and published 1911 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Shadows at the Water Hole
a.k.a. Apaches at a Water Hole
1907
published 1907 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Grass Fire
a.k.a. Backfiring
1908
published 1909 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
Calling the Moose
a.k.a. Calling to the Moose
a.k.a. Calling to Death
1901
published in Collier's Weekly
halftone
 
Fighting over a Stolen Herd
a.k.a. Fighting over the Captured Herd
a.k.a. Protecting the Herd
1896
published 1898 by The Werner Co., Akron, Ohio
rotogravure
 
Trailing Texas Cattle
1904
published in 1904 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
Pony Tracks in the Buffalo Trail
1904
published in 1904 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Warrior's Last Ride
1907
published in 1908 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Sentinel
1907
published as a print in 1909 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Pioneers
1903
published in 1904 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Cow-Boy
1902
published by Charles Scribner's Sons
color halftone
 
An Argument with the Town Marshal
1905
published in 1905 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Cossack Post
1902
published by Charles Scribner's Sons
color halftone
 
Old Ramon
part of A Bunch of Buckskins series of eight, a portfolio by R. H. Russell
1901
edition printed 1901
color lithograph
 
The Dead Men
a.k.a The Discovery
1908
published in 1911 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
In from the Night Herd
1907
published in 1912 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
The Gathering of the Trappers
1904
published in 1904 in Collier's Weekly
color halftone
 
A Cheyenne Buck
1901
part of A Bunch of Buckskins, series of eight, a portfolio by R. H. Russell and Company
color lithograph
 
Snaking Logs to the Skidway
a.k.a. The Tragedy of the Trees, Part II
1906
published in Collier's Weekly in 1906
color halftone
 
The Mountain Man
1990
The Maiden Foundry, OR, Museum Proof #3
1000 ounces of .999 fine silver
Recast from original #54, ©1903, Roman Bronze Works, NY
 
The Rattlesnake
1990
The Maiden Foundry, OR, Museum Proof #3
1000 ounces of .999 fine silver
Recast from original #100, ©1905, Roman Bronze Works, NY
 
The Broncho Buster
1989
The Maiden Foundry, OR, Museum Proof #3
1000 ounces of .999 fine silver
Recast from original #275, ©1895, Roman Bronze Works, NY
 
Bronze of Remington
1980
Ernest Berke
lost-wax cast bronze
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Augsbury, Jr

 

Editor's note: RL readers may also enjoy:

 

About Frederic Remington:

from other web sites:

Frederic Remington Choose a Google all books search, enter the artist's full name plus the word "artist" and then when the search results are retrieved click on:

 

TFAO also suggests these DVD or VHS videos:

Frederic Remington: The Truth of Other Days is a 58 minute American Masters series 1991 video filmed in high definition format. It was directed by Thomas L. Neff and produced by Home Vision Entertainment.

This program traces the career of the brilliant painter, sculptor and author Frederic Remington. Hundreds of original artworks are showcased while narration by Gregory Peck, interviews. Location footage, archival footage and period photographs create an illuminating frame around the works of one of America's finest artists. Frederic Remington: The Truth of Other Days also explores Remington's direct influence on filmmakers such as John Ford and his continuing influence on today's popular culture.

Remington and AVA: American Art is a 60 minute video from Mastervision and narrated by Arthur Godfrey. Frederic Remington immortalized the wild west in his paintings and sculptures, capturing for all time the intimate drama of the unbridled American spirit. The spirit of Remington lives on in the contemporary frontiers of American art, here paired on video with AVA, the prestigious Awards in the Visual Arts.

Truth of Other Days, The Features the art of Frederic Remington . 58 minutes (collection of Joslyn Art Museum)

TFAO does not maintain a lending library of videos or sell videos. Click here for information on how to borrow or purchase copies of VHS videos and DVDs listed in TFAO's Videos -DVD/VHS, an authoritative guide to videos in VHS and DVD format.

 

About Richard Lorenz:

from other web sites:

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